Archive for the 'Rural Studio' Category

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Metropolis - Jul/Aug 09 | Thicket - Sept/Oct 09 | Dwell - Oct 09

Metropolis - Jul/Aug 09 | Thicket - Sept/Oct 09 | Dwell - Oct 09

Too quiet here… on the blog. In real life, not so much. It’s been insanely busy at 1133 since our move-in last May. Rest assured, more content to come.

In the meantime, some late summer reading…

Auburn’s Rural Studio graces the cover of the July/August issue of Metropolis (take that Tavern on the Green!) with a feature by Suzanne LaBarre on the program eight years post-Sambo (that is, after the death of co-founder Samuel Mockbee in 2001). Be sure to pick up a hard copy to learn more about this important program… and to marvel at 1133 design-builders Will Brothers and Matthew Finley’s magnificent thesis project—the Newbern Firehouse—which gets a full spread (with photos by Timothy Hursley). Kudos Green Bottle gang!

And our own 1133 gets some ink in the September/October issue of Thicket as part of the “Homes We Love” section in the Home Idea Guide (with photos by Jason Wallis). Read all about it (and watch a little video starring Liane, Will & Matthew) after the jump.

[Update—September 15: See also the latest issue of Dwell (October 2009) for a story on Rural Studio’s $20,000 House… thanks Messr. Lambert!]

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Rural Studio Tour: gimme shelter

Vaulted.

Vaulted.

Just over a 15-minute drive from Newbern is Greensboro, Alabama (pop. 2,731) and site of the next stop on our Hale-oween Rural Studio tour (and Liane’s second favorite RS project)—The Hale County Animal Shelter.

The 2005–2006 thesis project of students Jeff Bazzell, Julieta Collart, Lana Farkas, Connely Farr, the “Dog Pound”, as it’s sometimes called, was conceived and constructed to help underfunded Hale County fulfill a state-mandated legal obligation calling for an animal shelter in each county.

The back.

The back.

Vault and the box.

Vault and the box.

With assistance from consulting structural engineer Joe Farruggia, the team of four (each, with no previous construction experience) utilized a lamella roof for the overarching, open-ended shelter structure. This large sweeping span sits slightly off-the-ground on steel legs rooted in concrete, and is constructed of conventional off-the-shelf 2x8s connected in a diamond pattern and sheathed in 1x4s and sheets of corrugated galvinized aluminum.

Galvinized perspective.

Galvinized perspective.

Diamond ribs.

Diamond ribs.

Steel feet.

Steel feet.

Galv-alum with Plexi band.

Galv-alum with Plexi band.

Three Plexiglas bands—at the top and either side—are carefully placed to keep furry tenants coolly shaded during the summer and comfortably warmed by direct sunlight during the winter.

Back of the box.

Back of the box.

Underneath this shimmery arc, the kennel structure is a modernist box comprised of 16 open-air pens (with under-floor heating to warm the animals during the winter), bookended by two enclosed air-conditioned spaces for kennel workers and the treatment of ill or injured animals.

Lou looking for pups.

Lou looking for pups.

Looking back.

Looking back.

Dead end.

Dead end.

The late Sambo Mockbee once said: “Everybody wants the same thing, rich or poor… not only a warm, dry room, but a shelter for the soul.”

The “Dog Pound” is a shelter for the soul… an expression of compassion and respect for all living things… another shining example of the Rural Studio ethos.

[Ed. note: Just a week prior to our visit, the Animal Shelter was shortlisted and highly commended in the Civic Category at the inaugural World Architecture Festival in Barcelona.]

1133 | Rural Studio
Beneath the roses
Fire!
Outside the Red Barn

Rural Studio Tour: beneath the roses

Lou on Subrosa.

Lou on Subrosa.

After seeing our first and favorite Rural Studio project during our Halloween visit to Hale County (Hale-oween!), Liane and I head next to the Rural Studio Office at Morrisette House so that we can check-in and get a map of the projects. There are so many (!)… and seeing as how it’s already past noon, Gayle Etheridge, the Rural Studio Office Manager, kindly helps us prioritize.

We’re quite anxious to experience Subrosa in person ever since seeing Timothy Hursley‘s brilliant (but tiny) photos on the Rural Studio site, so we go there first.

Located behind Chantilly House and the Bodark Amphitheater in Newbern, the elegiac Subrosa Pantheon was originally conceived by Rural Studio founder Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee as “a memorial to recently bereaved friends.”

A year after Sambo’s untimely death in 2002, his daughter Carol Mockbee arrived at the Rural Studio as an Outreach student. Despite having no previous building or architectural experience, Carol boldly undertook the design (adapted from her father’s notebooks) and creation of this noble concrete and steel structure.

Subrosa is a memorial. “A place to remember Sambo Mockbee and… a place to tell secrets as the Romans did, ‘sub rosa,’ underneath the roses.”

Kiva-like structure.

Kiva-like structure.

asor buS.

asor buS.

Over the tunnel.

Over the tunnel.

Tunnel entrance.

Tunnel entrance.

Inside the tunnel.

Inside the tunnel.

Inside Sub Rosa Pantheon.

Inside.

Sky opening.

Sky opening.

Bench and turtle pond.

Bench and turtle pond.

Turtle pond.

Turtle pond.

Beneath the roses.

Beneath the roses.

Sky opening.

Sky opening.

Samuel Mockbee.

Samuel Mockbee.

Mockbee mobile shadow.

Mockbee mobile shadow.

Bench and "secret-telling" apparatus.

Bench and "secret-telling" apparatus.

Subrosa.

Subrosa.

Super sub rosa.

Super sub rosa.

Momento mori.

Momento mori.

1133 | Rural Studio
Fire!
Outside the Red Barn

Rural Studio Tour: fire!

Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and City Hall.

Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and City Hall.

The Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and Town Hall holds the distinction of being the first new public building to be erected in Newbern since 1895. It’s also notable for being the Rural Studio thesis project of Will Brothers and Matthew Finley (in collaboration with with Elizabeth Ellington and Leia Price), co-founders of Green Bottle Workshop and architect/builders of our 1133.

Located directly across the street (AL-61) from the Red Barn, Newbern Post Office, and G.B.’s Mercantile, the 4,000 square foot structure houses three fire trucks and serves Newbernians as a town hall—a place to hold elections, council meetings, fire-fighting classes, and other community gatherings.

The sign.

The sign.

The station is supported by a wood and metal truss structure, and, on one side of the building, enclosed by translucent polycarbonate panels that are protected from the sun by cedar slats.

Polycarbonate panels.

Polycarbonate panels.

Cedar, polycarbonate and galv-alum.

Cedar, polycarbonate and galv-alum.

Cedar slats (detail).

Cedar slats (detail).

Can't fight the cedar!

Can't fight the cedar!

Unfortunately, we weren’t able to access the inside of the station during our visit (we shall return!), but we’ve been assured by Will and Matthew that there’s a mezzanine level for fire fighting classes, and, at the ground floor a bathroom and kitchen.

SSteps to the interior mezzanine level.

Steps to the interior mezzanine level.

On the side of the station opposite the cedar and polycarbonate, a long wall of galv-alum extends up and wraps over to form the roof of the station, resulting in an old-southern-barn-cum-shed aesthetic with a decidedly modernist bent.

Galv-alum wall.

Galv-alum wall.

Front overhang and wall (the flip-side of the galv-alum wall).

Front overhang and wall (the flip-side of the galv-alum).

For more on the Newbern Volunteer Fire Station, and to get a glimpse of the Rural Studio students in action during it’s design and construction, you can go here.

1133 | Rural Studio
Outside the Red Barn

Rural Studio Tour: outside the Red Barn

Semper tempus creo.

Semper tempus creo.

Liane and I had been wanting to make a visit to the Rural Studio ever since moving back to ‘Bama… almost two years ago (!). But our being steadily plagued by a drought in spare-time had kept us from making the small, south-westerly road trip toward Hale, Perry and Marengo Counties…

…until last Friday.

Our first stop was Newbern (pop. 231) and the Red Barn.

The Red Barn.

The Red Barn.

Formerly an old hay barn (and a frequent and favorite subject for the artist William Christenberry), it has served as the design studio and “academic hub” for second-year and thesis students since being rehabbed in 2002 under the supervision of Rural Studio Director Andrew Freear—who, on our arrival this Halloween day, was just inside leading a round of student reviews dressed as a Nudie-suited Elvis (sorry, no pictures).

Rust never sleeps.

Rust never sleeps.

Red Barn patchwork.

Red Barn patchwork.

Jack-o'-lanterns

Jack-o'-lanterns

Next to the Red Barn, there’s the Newbern Post Office, and a little general store—G.B.’s Mercantile—where we stopped in for an RC Cola and a Moon Pie (OK… two Moon Pies… chocolate and banana).

The Red Barn, Newbern Post Office and G.B.'s Mercantile (aka downtown Newbern).

The Red Barn, Newbern Post Office and G.B.'s Mercantile (aka downtown Newbern).

36765–9998

36765–9998

Pump outside G.B.'s.

Pump outside G.B.'s Mercantile.

Pup outside G.B.'s.

Pup outside G.B.'s Mercantile.

Together, these buildings, along with a very stately and distinctive building just across the street (about which, more later), are downtown Newbern.


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