Posts Tagged 'Galv-alum'

Week 37.3: guttered & doored

Galv-alum gutter.

Galv-alum gutter.

Front door in the dining room.

Front door in the dining room.

Rural Studio Tour: gimme shelter

Vaulted.

Vaulted.

Just over a 15-minute drive from Newbern is Greensboro, Alabama (pop. 2,731) and site of the next stop on our Hale-oween Rural Studio tour (and Liane’s second favorite RS project)—The Hale County Animal Shelter.

The 2005–2006 thesis project of students Jeff Bazzell, Julieta Collart, Lana Farkas, Connely Farr, the “Dog Pound”, as it’s sometimes called, was conceived and constructed to help underfunded Hale County fulfill a state-mandated legal obligation calling for an animal shelter in each county.

The back.

The back.

Vault and the box.

Vault and the box.

With assistance from consulting structural engineer Joe Farruggia, the team of four (each, with no previous construction experience) utilized a lamella roof for the overarching, open-ended shelter structure. This large sweeping span sits slightly off-the-ground on steel legs rooted in concrete, and is constructed of conventional off-the-shelf 2x8s connected in a diamond pattern and sheathed in 1x4s and sheets of corrugated galvinized aluminum.

Galvinized perspective.

Galvinized perspective.

Diamond ribs.

Diamond ribs.

Steel feet.

Steel feet.

Galv-alum with Plexi band.

Galv-alum with Plexi band.

Three Plexiglas bands—at the top and either side—are carefully placed to keep furry tenants coolly shaded during the summer and comfortably warmed by direct sunlight during the winter.

Back of the box.

Back of the box.

Underneath this shimmery arc, the kennel structure is a modernist box comprised of 16 open-air pens (with under-floor heating to warm the animals during the winter), bookended by two enclosed air-conditioned spaces for kennel workers and the treatment of ill or injured animals.

Lou looking for pups.

Lou looking for pups.

Looking back.

Looking back.

Dead end.

Dead end.

The late Sambo Mockbee once said: “Everybody wants the same thing, rich or poor… not only a warm, dry room, but a shelter for the soul.”

The “Dog Pound” is a shelter for the soul… an expression of compassion and respect for all living things… another shining example of the Rural Studio ethos.

[Ed. note: Just a week prior to our visit, the Animal Shelter was shortlisted and highly commended in the Civic Category at the inaugural World Architecture Festival in Barcelona.]

1133 | Rural Studio
Beneath the roses
Fire!
Outside the Red Barn

Rural Studio Tour: fire!

Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and City Hall.

Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and City Hall.

The Newbern Volunteer Fire Department Station and Town Hall holds the distinction of being the first new public building to be erected in Newbern since 1895. It’s also notable for being the Rural Studio thesis project of Will Brothers and Matthew Finley (in collaboration with with Elizabeth Ellington and Leia Price), co-founders of Green Bottle Workshop and architect/builders of our 1133.

Located directly across the street (AL-61) from the Red Barn, Newbern Post Office, and G.B.’s Mercantile, the 4,000 square foot structure houses three fire trucks and serves Newbernians as a town hall—a place to hold elections, council meetings, fire-fighting classes, and other community gatherings.

The sign.

The sign.

The station is supported by a wood and metal truss structure, and, on one side of the building, enclosed by translucent polycarbonate panels that are protected from the sun by cedar slats.

Polycarbonate panels.

Polycarbonate panels.

Cedar, polycarbonate and galv-alum.

Cedar, polycarbonate and galv-alum.

Cedar slats (detail).

Cedar slats (detail).

Can't fight the cedar!

Can't fight the cedar!

Unfortunately, we weren’t able to access the inside of the station during our visit (we shall return!), but we’ve been assured by Will and Matthew that there’s a mezzanine level for fire fighting classes, and, at the ground floor a bathroom and kitchen.

SSteps to the interior mezzanine level.

Steps to the interior mezzanine level.

On the side of the station opposite the cedar and polycarbonate, a long wall of galv-alum extends up and wraps over to form the roof of the station, resulting in an old-southern-barn-cum-shed aesthetic with a decidedly modernist bent.

Galv-alum wall.

Galv-alum wall.

Front overhang and wall (the flip-side of the galv-alum wall).

Front overhang and wall (the flip-side of the galv-alum).

For more on the Newbern Volunteer Fire Station, and to get a glimpse of the Rural Studio students in action during it’s design and construction, you can go here.

1133 | Rural Studio
Outside the Red Barn

Week 15: Steelworkers Local 1133

It’s steel time! The beginning of week 15 sees Will and Matthew breaking out the big guns and setting to work on the steel brows—the heavy steel bands that will hold the steel and galv-alum overhangs (one above the glass wall downstairs, and one above the exterior balcony outside the master bathroom upstairs).

Meister brow.

Meister brow.

With eyebrows firmly in place by Tuesday, the rafter tails are next. These long projecting arms continue the language of their wooden counterparts on the west elevation.

Steel tails below.

Tails below (over the glass wall).

Tails above.

Tails above (over the exterior balcony).

Tails east.

Tails east.

But it wasn’t all steel for Will and Matthew. Putting in the wooden trim for the windows and doors (upstairs and downstairs) rounded out a busy week, cut short by a cold front that brought Friday rain.

What's more, a door.

What's more, a door.

What's more, another door.

What's more, another door.

Big window, door, little window.

Big window, door, little window.

Friday also brought more visitors…

…on whom, a bit more later.

Wee window, be less wee.

Bigger?

Bigger?

If you’ve been following these last few postings on the progress of our 1133 (worded or wordless), you may have noticed the differently cladded extending structure at the front, west-facing side of the house. A little box… or the beginnings of a box. A box in progress, if you like.

And if you have, you may have also noticed that this shiny little box has one great opening to the west (destined for great glassy and door-ish things) and one lesser so to the north, front-facing side. An opening, lesser not in importance, mind you, but in scale. A window. A wee window.

But, too wee?

In some of the original elevations (particularly the kitchen), the front-facing window is shown much wider—longer and more horizontal—but as design progressed and plans were formalized, the Green Bottle Gang reconsidered this window and how it might better interact with the interior space…

…and arrived at: square (it’s hipper, so we’re told).

Hardie, meet galv-alum.

Hardie, meet galv-alum.

Up and to the left.

Up and to the left.

Like all windows, it will have two lives: exterior and interior.

As seen from the outside, the window lives slightly off-center and to the left, close to where the two types of cladding join. It is designed to be, like its counterpart cousin on the east-side of the house, a moment; a little box within a little box peering through cascading vertical lines of crimped galv-alum. Its inside life—in the space that will be the 1133 dining room—will see it directly corresponding with the central axis of a long, wooden dining table and overseeing many future gatherings of family and friends.

But, cut back to exterior, and the question (again): too wee?

Oui.

But, we hadn’t thought so at first—that is, at the point just after the window and side were framed, but before the cladding had been applied. After the galv-alum was up, though, there was, we thought, something that seemed a bit, well… certainly not bad (Will and Matthew aren’t capable of bad), just a bit… off.

Initially, we put it down to having stared for so long at the elevations; perhaps we couldn’t move past them. But, there had already been a number of other divergences, and none of those had us scratching our heads.

So, what was it about this little window?

Pulling into the lot one afternoon, it hit us: it felt like it was getting lost.

Not a problem, we thought, if we’d been able to stick with the guys’ original plans and clad the structure in steel. A flat, smooth consistent surface wouldn’t distract the eye from noticing an opening of this size (roughly 12 inches by 12 inches), but the strong vertical lines created by the galv-alum now seemed to overpower it.

After thinking and talking, and pleading our case to Will and Matt, we arrived at: bigger…

It growed.

It growed.

…but, not much bigger… just a wee bit bigger. 3 inches added to the top and right.

This subtle, but important, addition should have the window filling a bit more of the left third (so that it doesn’t appear to hug the corner too, too much), and straddling two of the main galv-alum vertical extrusions (still off-center, but in a more centered way… if that makes sense).

As of the end of this week (week 15 for you counting types), the adjustment had been made to the interior framework (see above); and now, we’re anxiously awaiting the return of the roof dude to finish out the exterior.

Until then…

Week 13: lucky for some

Words to follow shortly…

In the meantime, pictures!

Putting on a face.

Putting on a face.

The Lilliputians were here.

The Lilliputians were here.

Exterior balcony and steel lip.

Exterior balcony and steel lip.

The Trojan Duck (back view).

The Trojan Duck (back view).

Cut-out for the glass handrail.

Cut-out for the glass handrail.

East peep.

East peep.

Board expression.

Board expression.

Week 12: eyes without a face

As the cladding adventures continue, distinct changes on the home front… or is that, the front of the house?

Yes, it is the front of the house!

As the Hardie Boys have grown in their ability to reach new heights (thanks to their pump jack scaffolding system dealio), lo and behold, what once was featureless is now feature-full (…was blind, but now can see, etc.).

The house… has eyes! And they seem to be indicating shared, unspoken knowledge.

The Winking.

Wes Craven's The House Has Eyes 2: The Winking.

And to the left.

And to the left.

After the framers have the front fully-cladded, the Green Bottle gang will turn their attention to the area between 1133’s new eyes and the mouth below them (also known as the window wall). This is where the “eyebrow” will go—an overhang that will project outward from the front and, following the line of the window wall, wrap around to the north east side of the house. The eyebrow, like the roof and dining room extension, will also be covered in galv-alum. For now though, the steel supports rest patiently in the red, just beyond the terrace on the east side of the house.

Steel for the eyebrows.

Steel for the eyebrows (or is it a mustache?).

The north east corner (almost).

The north east corner (almost).

And, speaking of galv-alum, 1133 now sports a shiny, new…

…roof!

Is that a metal roof?

Is that a metal roof?

It is! It is a metal roof!

It is! It is a metal roof!

But… no solar panels? Pourquois?

Perhaps, one day, our roof may be able to absorb as much light as it currently reflects, but solar panels now? Sadly, we just couldn’t afford them. But, again, we’re still trying to green as much as our green will allow.

Our trusty galv-alum has also started to make itself known on the west side dining room extension… more a peep really than a full-fledged announcement.

The West Side Diner.

The West Side Diner.

And as the Hardie Boys finish up their exploits in the back of the house, the resulting view is very, very nice. This just may explain why the front was winking.

In the immortal words of Sir Mix-A-Lot…

In the immortal words of Sir Mix-A-Lot…


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